Monday, December 7, 2009

Should I Trust My Sales Manager’s Advice?

A good portion of salespeople wonder at some point during their tenure with a company as to whether or not they should trust their sales manager’s advice. I wanted to tackle this issue head-on this month as this is an important subject which impacts all salespeople.

Generally speaking, you should trust your sales manager’s advice. However, this doesn’t mean you should stick your head in the sand when he or she gives you advice, either. It is always important to weigh their advice and mix in your own experience & knowledge before taking action. It is also a good idea to engage your sales manager with your own thoughts after you have been given his or her advice. After all, two heads are certainly better than one. Issues and problems which come up when working in a sales capacity can be complicated, so never be afraid to seek out your sales manager’s opinion before moving forward.

If you know for a fact that your sales manager’s advice cannot be trusted, I would think very seriously about continuing with your present employer. At the very least, you might want to consider making a lateral move within the company. Poor sales managers who give bad advice will ultimately not only impact your moral in a negative way, but will also impact your sales numbers and income at some point in the future, too.

While the majority of sales managers do a good job, there are still far too many sales managers who fall into the “poor” category. This can even sometimes happen at companies where the company is great but the sales manager seems to sabotage sales at every stage of the game because he or she is a poor manager in general. Whatever the case may be, it is always a bad idea to continue working for a manager who doesn’t know what it really takes to sell or is simply incompetent.

The bottom line is that you ultimately need to trust your sales manager to sustain long-term success. Don’t be afraid to seek out their advice when you need it. And if you can’t trust your sales manager, you need to move on to another company or make a position change within the same company.

25 comments:

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Real Life Selling said...

Good article, reminds me of the old advice "remember... you only ever work for yourself".

lloyd klein said...

you should post a little more. I don't quite understand what you mean poor sales managers, you're very contradictory in your article. Always take advice from others good or bad its what helps mold you into a force. Its the it's what to do and what not to do. If you don't like your manager get over it, if they can't sell they wouldn't be in that position if somehow they got lucky, out produce by using resources around you and take his or her position.

Dating Advice said...

In many ways I agree with your article. Way to often sales managers don't know what they are doing.

But, usually they are managers for a reason.
If you as a salesman don't listen to your manager, more often than not, it will hurt your sales in the future.

//Daniel M. Wood
Looking To Business

Eric said...

Trusting a sales manager means that you allow thier input into your decison making.
It stills goes back to " two sets of eyes" and the sales managers experienced eyes are usually a good source of help especially for the novice sales rep.
For the sales rep the utilization of outside advice is as necessary to thier closing average as a batting coaches advice is to Alex Rodriguez increasing his batting average.

Mark Goodson said...

The problem is that most sales managers still think they are "in the trenches". Just because someone is the top sales person doesn't necessarily mean they will be a top sales manager.
--
Cheers
Mark

Think-Grow said...

Well ... In the end, the sales manager holds the ultimate responsibility, but the moral obligations of all team members is to express their opinion freely, while adhering to management's directions. Responsibility lines are there for a reason, knowing that this doesn't diminish the importance of anybody's role.


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Noel said...

The decision to take the advice is still your own choice. But with any decision making, take into consideration the pros and cons, weigh it out, and act on it. If what you decided on was against your manager's advice, show him why it is so. You might even impress him.

Information on sales can be found here at Sales Course Training. Drop by and share a thought.

medicare supplement said...

When one hires a Sales Manager one is relying on their experience and expertise in knowing how to get the sales. Hopefully sales staff will benefit from the manager's input and work together to grow the company business. This would be ideal but I think your article is correct in suggesting that it's better to move than to suffer under a poor Sales Manager.

Pete Weeze said...

Good read, thanks for posting.
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Björn said...

Thx for a good post, especially the part about having a manager that cannot be trusted. I have been in that situation once and could not agree more... If that sort of situation is unsolvable, leave...

CR Sales said...

it's true

"two heads are certainly better than one"

Successful B2B Marketing said...

Trust with analyzable is good to develop the business sales promotion..I like to follow the tips from your writing.thanks.keep sharing.

Sales Tracking Software said...

I think your opinion is spot on. However, if your sales manager follows your every move and much like the micro management type I would imagine that "sticking your head in the sand" or following your own way might not be the right choice bec like you said it will create for a terrible moral inside yourself.
Like you said a combination of both heads is probably the best bet!:)

Sales CRM Software said...

I think your opinion is spot on. However, if your sales manager follows your every move and much like the micro management type I would imagine that "sticking your head in the sand" or following your own way might not be the right choice bec like you said it will create for a terrible moral inside yourself. Like you said a combination of both heads is probably the best bet!:)

Jon mohan said...

Nice post. I gotta tell you that sales manager is a post and someones job. Well when you are recruiting then you should be careful & later on the question of trusting will not arise.

Thanks

Sale
http://www.offermyoffer.com

Kentbiofuel said...

Hi - Great Blog, got you bookmarked!

Sales managers want you to sell right!?! however some of them got to the position of Sales Manager by "plodding" beat your targets and always learn as much as you can about YOUR product as well as YOUR techniques!

Please have a look at this 37 second video with Cold Calling Guru Bob Etherington

Cold Calling For Chickens

Respect

Tim
Kent BioFuel

Sales motivation said...

I would say a a rule that most sales managers got their position because they had high sales and they really dont know whay they had high sales so they cant really teach others. therefore, you really cant trust most sales managers.

Sales Courses said...

Great post, all sales managers could do with additionalSalesCourses and training.

thomaru said...

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Mr.Matan Shamir Co-Founder - Director Bbetter said...

A good portion of salespeople wonder at some point during their tenure with a company as to whether or not they should trust their sales manager’s advice. I wanted to tackle this issue head-on this month as this is an important subject which impacts all salespeople.

Generally speaking, you should trust your sales manager’s advice. However, this doesn’t mean you should stick your head in the sand when he or she gives you advice, either. It is always important to weigh their advice and mix in your own experience & knowledge before taking action. It is also a good idea to engage your sales manager with your own thoughts after you have been given his or her advice. After all, two heads are certainly better than one. Issues and problems which come up when working in a sales capacity can be complicated, so never be afraid to seek out your sales manager’s opinion before moving forward.

If you know for a fact that your sales manager’s advice cannot be trusted, I would think very seriously about continuing with your present employer. At the very least, you might want to consider making a lateral move within the company. Poor sales managers who give bad advice will ultimately not only impact your moral in a negative way, but will also impact your sales numbers and income at some point in the future, too.

While the majority of sales managers do a good job, there are still far too many sales managers who fall into the “poor” category. This can even sometimes happen at companies where the company is great but the sales manager seems to sabotage sales at every stage of the game because he or she is a poor manager in general. Whatever the case may be, it is always a bad idea to continue working for a manager who doesn’t know what it really takes to sell or is simply incompetent.

The bottom line is that you ultimately need to trust your sales manager to sustain long-term success. Don’t be afraid to seek out their advice when you need it. And if you can’t trust your sales manager, you need to move on to another company or make a position change within the same company. Matan shamir 2011

Arnold Dame said...

Not always! The sales manager must not overstep bounds, I agree. But one must keep in mind that they do have some more expertise in the matter, hence their position! Tough scenarios though.

Career Counseling said...

This type of counseling tends to be quite practical and usually involves the counselor and client developing and agreeing on an action plan.

sales recruitment melbourne said...

I think you should trust on your sales manager's advice. Sales managers have an abundance of knowledge and experience of sales which is very necessary for a sales person. Thank you for taking this opportunity to talk about this, I feel fervently about it.

commission only sales jobs said...

Great article! Sales agents should be trained and coached on an ongoing basis. I believe this also applies to sales managers as they have to constantly adapt to the different styles of selling from their sales teams not to mention market conditions.