Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Tony Soprano Selling

I am still a very big fan of the show The Sopranos. The episodes were crafted so well that it seems like you see something new in them every time you watch. It really was one of the best shows to ever grace a television screen.

My favorite character, like most fans, was Tony Soprano. Now Tony always made a lot of mistakes, but he also had some attractive qualities salespeople should pay attention to when it comes to selling.

No, I'm not talking about giving anyone a "beat down". Nor am I talking about "whacking" a prospect or customer (I hope you were not thinking of that!). What I am talking about, however, is the power and respect that the Tony Soprano character carried through the series. So few salespeople view themselves as powerful, and emulating Tony Soprano in this way would be very helpful to salespeople looking to put strong sales numbers on the board. Ask yourself this: Would Tony Soprano take abuse from prospects or customers on a regular basis?

Tony Soprano also realized at times that his position was weak and he would even go to a "bended knee" if it was necessary. While he never made a habit if this, he was smart enough to understand it was his best position to take in certain situations he encountered in the series. He didn't give the farm away to solve a tough issue, but gave just enough away to maintain order for the moment.

Salespeople should realize they should act as powerful individuals, but also have enough instinctive ability to understand when a "bended knee" is necessary. The Tony Soprano character provides a great balance between both of these positions we must sometimes take in the business world.

1 comment:

Laney said...

Interesting anaylsis.

You're right about the fine balance there. You don't want to be so arrogant that you offend the prospects. But you also don't want to be so humble and submissive that the prospect either chooses not to buy from you because he doesn't respect you, or buys from you but pushes you around to the point that it's not a mutually beneficial relationship.

Be the boss!

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